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Happy and Blessed Thanksgiving Day Everyone!

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KolleenWStone
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"Thank you" Family for being here, and hanging on while we continually watch and wait together! :bible :rose:

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KolleenWStone
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🙂

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Geri9
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Hoping everyone is having a good time with your company.  How many were able to get the conversations to perhaps Biblical topics and the soon rapture home going?  Any success stories or did they quickly give you “that” look 😳 and change the subject or … did they excused themselves to … check on the turkey in the kitchen? 😉

 

Here’s a 4 minute clip from Aaron and Kristi  …

Awkward Family Holiday Rapture Conversation 😂

- Fair Use -

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Patricia N.
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‘Long Before Karl Marx’ the Pilgrims Experimented with Socialism: Rush Limbaugh’s True Story of Thanksgiving Revisited:

Rush Limbaugh left us nearly three years ago after succumbing to a bout with cancer.  Throughout his more than three decades as a fixture for conservatives on the radio, Limbaugh maintained an annual tradition of retelling the “true” story of Thanksgiving during his last broadcast before the Thanksgiving holiday.

. . . .  the True Story of Thanksgiving has been obscured by what is taught — what I was taught, you were probably taught.   . . . .The Indians took pity on them. The Indians saw them, and the Indians saved them. The Indians taught ’em how to do things they didn’t know how to do, like grow food, catch beavers, stuff like that.  The Indians saved them, and the Pilgrims thanked them by growing a whole bunch of food and having this big feast.

The Real Story of Thanksgiving, going back to the very first early days of the Pilgrims arriving at Plymouth Rock, is that socialism failed.

“The story of the Pilgrims begins in the early part of the seventeenth century… The Church of England under King James I was persecuting anyone and everyone who did not recognize [the church’s] absolute civil and spiritual authority,” actually, the state.

“Those who challenged ecclesiastical authority and those who believed strongly in freedom of worship were hunted down…” This is in England in the 1600s. They “were hunted down and imprisoned, and sometimes executed for their beliefs. A group of separatists,” people who didn’t want any part of this, “first fled to Holland."

They were there for eleven years. “After eleven years, about forty of” these separatists . . . . “agreed to make a perilous journey to the New World…” They had heard about it. Some new, exciting place that hadn’t been developed. They knew they would “face hardships,” hardships like you and I don’t know.

“On August 1, 1620, the Mayflower set sail. It carried a total of 102 passengers, including forty” of these separatists, the Pilgrims. There were just 40 of them. They were “led by William Bradford."

The Mayflower was not much bigger than a 50-foot boat, and 102 people on it. “On the journey, Bradford set up an agreement, a contract” if you will, “that established just and equal laws for all [40] members of the [Pilgrim] community, irrespective of their religious beliefs.” It didn’t matter what their religious beliefs were.

These are the laws they were all agreeing to live by. “Where did the revolutionary ideas,” these laws, come from? We’re talking about the Mayflower Compact. That is what Bradford wrote. The Mayflower Compact derived “[f]rom the Bible. The Pilgrims were a people completely steeped in the lessons of the Old and New Testaments.”

. . . . the Pilgrims finally landed in New England in November. . . . During that first winter — remember, they arrive in November — during that first winter, half of them, including William Bradford’s own wife, died of starvation, of sickness, exposure to the elements.  Spring finally came. They did meet the Indians, the Native Americans who were there, who did help them in planting corn and fishing for cod. They showed ’em where the beavers were so the beavers could be skinned for coats, other things.

Now, here’s the part that has been omitted. The original contract the Pilgrims entered into in Holland — they had sponsors. They didn’t have the money to do this trip on their own. They had sponsors. There were merchant sponsors in London and in Holland. And these merchant sponsors demanded that everything that the Pilgrims produced in the New World would go into a common store, a single bank, if you will. And that each member of the Pilgrim community was entitled to one share.

So everybody had an equal share of whatever was in that bank. All of the land they cleared, all of the houses they built belonged to that bank, to the community as well. And they were going to distribute it equally, because they were gonna be fair. So all of the land that they cleared and all the houses they built belonged to everybody. Belonged to the community. Belonged to the bank, belonged to the common store. Nobody owned anything. They just had an equal share in it. It was a commune.

Now, William Bradford, who had become the governor of the colony ’cause he was the leader, recognized that this wasn’t gonna work. This was costly and destructive, and it just wasn’t working. It was collectivism. It was socialism. It wasn’t working. That first winter had taken a lot of lives. The manpower was greatly reduced.

The Mayflower Compact was not working. . . .  “‘For this community [so far as it was] was found to breed much confusion and discontent…’” They were not happy, in other words. “‘[T]his community was found to breed much confusion and discontent and retard much employment that would have been to their benefit and comfort.’”  In other words, nobody worked.  The way they set it up, killed and discouraged work.  There was no need.

So Bradford decided to scrub it. He threw it out and took bold action. He assigned a plot of land to each family. Every family was given a plot of land. They could work it, manage it however they wanted to. If they just wanted to sit on it, get fat, dumb, happy, and lazy, they could. If they wanted to develop it, if they wanted to grow corn, whatever on it, they could. If they wanted to build on it, they could do that. If they wanted to turn it into a quasi-business, they could do whatever they wanted to do with it.  He turned loose the power of the capitalist marketplace.

Pilgrims had discovered and experimented with what could only be described as socialism, and they found that it didn’t work. Now, it wasn’t called that then. But that’s exactly what it was. Everybody was given an equal share. You know what happened? Nobody did anything. There was no incentive. Nothing worked. Nothing happened.

“What Bradford and his community found was that the most creative and industrious people had no incentive to work any harder than anyone else, unless they could utilize the power of personal motivation! But while most of the rest of the world has been experimenting with socialism for well over a hundred years – trying to refine it, perfect it, and re-invent it – the Pilgrims decided early on to scrap it permanently. What Bradford wrote about this social experiment should be in every schoolchild’s history lesson. If it were, we might prevent much needless suffering,” if the true story of Thanksgiving had been taught for years and years and years.

“‘This had very good success,’ wrote Bradford, ‘for it made all hands industrious, so as much more corn was planted than otherwise would have been.’” So when profit was introduced, when the opportunity to prosper was introduced, it went gangbusters. That, my friends, is the essence of the True Story of Thanksgiving.

“So they set up trading posts and exchanged goods with the Indians” after they had enjoyed this prosperity.  They sold stuff to them, and those “profits allowed them to pay off their debts to the merchants,” their sponsors in London and in Holland, and you know what?

The success of that colony after they had abandoned socialism and tried what was essentially capitalism, the word spread throughout the Old World of this massive amount of prosperity that was there for the taking in the New World. And guess what happened? The New World was flooded with new arrivals. “[T]he success and prosperity of the Plymouth settlement attracted more Europeans and began what came to be known as the ‘Great Puritan Migration.’”

. . . .it was “an Indian named Squanto came to their rescue.”  it was Squanto who “taught the Pilgrims how to plant and fish,” how to skin beavers. It was Squanto who “broker[ed] a peace treaty between the Pilgrims and other Indian tribes.”

There was more than one tribe of Indians. It was not copacetic. It was not friendly and at one with nature. It was not anything like the multiculturalists would have you believe. There were squabbles; there were power struggles; turf battles. It was human. The Indians, the Pilgrims, everybody was scrambling for power, for survival. Survivability was the name of the game. And it was not guaranteed.

And they experienced a tremendous harvest in 1621, and that’s the big gathering that is taught in the history books, the native Indians and the Pilgrims joined together for a huge feast, which is the foundational story of the Thanksgiving story that’s taught in public schools.

But again, that is not The Real Story of Thanksgiving. That’s the textbook brand. It did happen, but it’s so much more than that. “One of the most important legacies of early settlers is that they experimented with socialism in the 1620s, and it didn’t work. Private property rights and personal responsibility, two pillars of a free market economy, saved the Plymouth colony from extinction and laid the economic foundation for the free and prosperous nation that we all enjoy today.”

And that is exactly right. And that is The True Story of Thanksgiving.

https://www.breitbart.com/clips/2023/11/23/long-before-karl-marx-the-pilgrims-experimented-with-socialism-rush-limbaughs-true-story-of-thanksgiving-revisited/

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Tammie
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Happy belated Thanksgiving — yesterday was my birthday, yes I’m a Turkey :mdrmdr:

Spent the day with my oldest daughter s family and 7 of my grandchildren. A huge blessing. So thankful for Gods wonderful grace and mercy.
I do believe this was my last birthday and thanksgiving holiday on earth. :yahoo:

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Todd Tomlinson
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Happy Birthday Tammie!

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KolleenWStone
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Happy Day Tammie! :flyup:

 

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Yohanan
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Happy birthday, Tammie!

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Geri9
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Happy Belated Birthday, Tammie!

Here’s hoping your next celebration birthday party be :mail: as early as in a week or two?  When we all get those glorified bodies and a brand new birthday we can all share together and we get new names and new dwelling places and new clothes and new .. everything! :whistle:

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Tammie
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Thank you everyone — please keep us in prayer as we travel back home tomorrow — it will be rainy weather most of the 500 miles. It has been a wonderful visit and heading back to the daily grind is not a happy thought. But as many of us are aware — this may be only minutes and hours or days and a few weeks left, so it is bearable. :prayer-hands:

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